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Sketches of North Carolina by Foote

SKETCHES OF NORTH CAROLINA,

HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL,

ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE PRINCIPLES

OF A PORTION OF HER EARLY SETTLERS.

BY REV. WILLIAM HENRY FOOTE.

1846

CHAPTER I. THE FIRST DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, MAY, 1775.

The Village of Charlotte, its Situation, and Origin of its Name. The Convention, May 19th, 1775, the Preparatory Steps, its Organization and Object. An Incident related by General Graham. Committee present the Resolutions drawn by Dr. Brevard. THE MECKLENBURG DECLARATION, Unanimously Adopted. THE SECOND MECKLENBURG DECLARATION. Capt. Jack take, the Declaration to Philadelphia, reads the Papers in Salisbury, is opposed by Dunn and Boote. The Delegates decline laying the Declaration before Congress; Circulation and Preservation of the Copies. The Action of the Committee in the Case of Dunn and Boote. Associations first formed according to the Recommendations of Continental Congress. Provincial Council. County Committees of Safety. A Certificate. FIRST DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE BY THE CONSTITUTED AUTHORITIES OF A STATE. Inquiry concerning the Origin of the People forming the Convention

CHAPTER II BLOOD SHED ON THE ALAMANCE The First Bleed Shed in the Revolution, May 16th, 1776,

The Situation and Origin of the name of Hillsborough ; its Connection with Past Events. Discontent in Orange and neighboring Counties. Governor Tryon marches to Orange with Armed Forces; his first Visit and its Failure. The Excitement of the People. The Eastern men mistake the Western, The Commencement of the Disturbances. The Sheriff hindered In his Duty, 1760. Pamphlet in Granville, 1705. Causes of the Complaint among the People. Frauds of Childs and Corbin in Signing Patents. The Proclamations Disregarded. Example of Hardship in going to Market. Proposed meeting at Maddocks Mill, Oct. 10th, 1766. Meeting at Deep River. Fannings opinion of the Meeting. Another Meeting, 1767. Commencement of the REGULATION. Building the Governors Palace in Newbern, Another Meeting in 1763 addresses the Governor; his reply. Unjustifiable outbreaks unfairly charged on the Regulation. Governor Proclaims the Regulation an Insurrection; Ninian Bell Hamilton. The Regulators in Arms, August 11th, 1768. The Governors Justice, his Proclamation. The persons excepted. Report of Maurice Moore, 1776. Extract from Records of Court in Hillsborough. Acts of Personal violence; a Mock Trial. Four New Counties made. The Governors Circular, 1771. General Waddel goes to Salisbury. The Black Boys. Waddel retires before the Regulators. Orders. Certificate. Governor crosses the Haw, May 11th, approaches the Regulators; Negotiation. The Governor kills Robert Thompson. The Flag of Truces fired on. The Governor commands his men to fire. Regulators Routed. Governor hangs James Few. Case of Captain Messer. Governor leads his prisoners in chains. Execution of six prisoners near Hillsborough. Tryon returns to Newbern. Fannings Flight. Husbands Flight. Inquiry into the origin of the men engaged in the Regulation

CHAPTER III. A PAPER ON CIVIL AND RELIGIOUS LIBERTY, IN 1775.

Widow Brevard; her son Alexander. Judge Brevard. Her son Ephraim; his Education; the part he took in the Convention in Mecklenburg; the Circumstances of his Death. Death of Mrs. Jackson. INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE DELEGATES OF MECKLENBURG COUNTY. The Principles of Civil and Religious Liberty

CHAPTER IV. COMMENCEMENT OF PRESBYTERIAN SETTLEMENTS IN NORTH CAROLINA

The Emigrants previous to about 1736, from Virginia, Colonies of Huguenots and Palatines. Quakers or Friends. The Presbyterians in Duplin, and in Frederick, Augusta, and Virginia. Settlements on the Eno. Western Counties set off. Encouragement to Emigrate. Lord Granvilles portion of Carolina set off. The Scotch on Cape Fear. Congregations and Churches in the Upper Country. Origin of the people worthy of notice. Influence of Religious Principle

CHAPTER V. ORIGIN OF THE SCOTCH IRISH.

To be found in Ireland under Elizabeth and James. Reformation in England partly Voluntary; in Ireland Involuntary. Kings Supremacy acknowledged, 1536. The Bible in Ireland, 1556. Conspiracy of Tyrconnel and Tyrone, 1605, and Ulster forfeited to the Crown. The Province surveyed by Chichester and allotted to three kinds of occupants. Lands generally occupied, 1610. Stewarts account of the Emigrants to Ireland. Con ONeill loses part of his Estate. Emigrants under Montgomery. Situation of the County in 1618. The name Scotch Irish ; their character

CHAPTER VI. STATE OF RELIGION IN IRELAND FROM THE TIME OF THE EMIGRATION FROM SCOTLAND TO THE FIRST EFFORTTO EMIGRATE TO AMERICA, 1631.

The Emigrants from Scotland. Stewarts character of them. The opinion in Scotland about the Emigration. Christian Ministers go over to Ireland to the Emigrants : 1st, Edward Brice; 2d, John Ridge; 3d, M. Hubbard; 4th, James Glendenning; 5th, Robert Cunningham; 6th, Robert Blair; 7th, James Hamilton. The Success of these Ministers. Commencement of the Greet Revival. Stewarts account of it. The Monthly Meeting at Antrim. Stewarts and Blairs account of it. More Ministers pass over to Ireland. The 8th, Josias Welch; 9th, Andrew Stewart; 10th, George Dunbar; Andrew Brown, the Deaf Mute; 11th, Henry Colwort; ; 12th, John Livingston, of Kirks, of Shotts Memory; 13th, John McClelland; 14th, John Semple. Monthly Meeting at Antrim improved. Bodily Exercises no mark of Religion

CHAPTER VII. THE EAGLE WING, OR FIRST ATTEMPT AT EMIGRATIONFROM IRELAND TO AMERICA.

Cause of The attempt at Emigration. Four Ministers forbid the Ministry. Delegates appointed to Now England. Cotton Mathers notice of the matter. The Eagle Wing sails, 1636, with a band of Emigrants. Livingstons account of the Voyage. Child Baptized at sea. Vessel driven back to Ireland. The reception of the Emigrants. The Ministers return to Scotland in 1037; their flocks go over to receive the Sacraments. The Influence of these men on Ireland and the World.

CHAPTER VIII FORMATION OF PRESBYTERIES IN IRELAND.

First Meeting of a Presbytery in Ireland, 1642. Steps Preparatory. Convocation of the Irish Clergy appointed Usher to draw up a Confession of Faith. Its character. Heylins account of the Church in Ushers time. Blair and Livingston s course respecting Ordination. Laymen conduct public worship after the Clergy retire to Scotland. The Scottish army introduced to crush Rebellion, 1611. Massacre of Protestants. Six Chaplains accompany the Scotch regiments; also Mr. Livingston. Regular Presbyterian Churches formed in the Regiments. The Presbytery Constituted. Sessions formed in the country around. The people petition the General Assembly of Scotland for Supplies. Six Ministers sent to regulate the Churches. The Congregation take possession of some of the vacant Parish Churches. Some persons Episcopally ordained, join the Presbytery. Solemn League and Covenant adopted in Scotland, 1643, and in many parts of Ireland, 1644. Its effect. Number of Presbyterian Ministers in Ireland from 1647 to 1657. The first Presbytery divided into five Presbyteries. Number of Ministers in 1660 and in 1680. The Presbytery of Lagan license the first Presbyterian Minister settled in the United States; Francis Makemie

CHAPTER IX. THE POLITICAL SENTIMENTS OF THE SCOTCH IRISH EMIGRANTS.

They were Loyal. Reasons for their ancestors being chosen to colonise Ireland. Their views of the authority of Parliament after the Kings Death. How the Magistrates are to be chosen. 2d. They insisted on choosing their own Ministers of Religion; this the source of all their trouble; Republicans in their nations, 3d. They demanded ordination by Presbyters; instead of Bishops. 4th. Strict discipline in morals and in the instruction of Youth. Their views of Education. Connection of their Religion with their politics. Their agreement in fundamentals; and disagreement in smaller matters

CHAPTER X. THE SETTLEMENT OF THE SCOTCH ON THE RIVER CAFE FEAR, AND THE REVEREND JAMES CAMPBELL.

Some families Settled as early as 1729. The Clark family as early as 1730, from the Hebrides. Charles Edward, the Pretender, appears, lands in Scotland. The heads of the great Clans against his plans; joined by the young men. Is for a time successful. Is ruined at Culloden. Executions fellow his defeat; the country laid waste; but the Prince escapes. Anecdote of a Scotch gentleman. Anecdote of Kennedy. The Rebels condemned; 17 suffer, the rest exiled, go to Cape Fear; causes of settling there. The Religion of the Scotch. No Minister came with the first Emigrants, The Rev. James Campbell; birth place; emigrates to America; gives over Preaching. By means of Whitefield resumes his Ministry. Emigrates to Cape Fear. His extensive labors; his regular preaching places. Bluff and its Elders. Barbacue and its Elders. Use of the Gaelic Language. The Rev. John McLeod

CHAPTER XI. THE POLITICAL OPINIONS OF THE SCOTCH EMIGRANTS.

The Scotch net Radicals; desired a Government of Law. The Bible their guide. Revolution. Natural right in given cases. Their National Covenants; their object. Hetheringtons view of the Covenants. Rutherfords Lex Rex. Charles 2d and James 1st, swore to the Covenants; the Oath. Division of sentiment about the Revolution, The Association in Cumberland, drawn by Robert Rowan, 1775. Governor Martin commissions. Donald MDonald as Brigadier. He erects the Royal Standard, Feb., 1776. The Camp at Campbellton, or Cross Creeks. Col, Moore marches against him MDonald sends an Embassy. Moves down to Moores Creek. Makes so attack on Caswell and Livingston, and is defeated. The action or of the Provincial Congress respecting the Prisoners

CHAPTER XII. FLORA MDONALD.

Her first appearance in the Trials of the Pretender. Roderick Makenzie. The Prince lands on South Ulster; is followed by three thousand armed men. Plans for his escape in disguise. Appeal to Flora MDonald; she accepts the offer. ONeill joins. Interview with the Prince. A Passport procured for the Prince disguised as a servant. The danger of discovery. They set sail. A tempest. Land at Kilbride. New dangers from Soldiers; escape. The Princes farewell. His escape from Scotland. Flora MDonald seized and conveyed to London. The companions of her confinement. The nobility become interested in her favor. Prince Frederick procures her release. She is introduced at Court, loaded with presents and sent home. Marries Allen MDonald and emigrates to North Carolina. Her stay at Cross Creeks, at Camerons Hill, and in Anson County; joins the Royal Standard at Cross Creeks. After her husbands release they return to Scotland. Attacked by a Privateer on the Voyage her heroism. Her family; the close of her life; her burial place .

CHAPTER XIII. HUGH M'ADEN AND THE CHURCHES IN DUPLIN, NEW HANOVER AND CASWELL,

The first Presbyterian Minister that visited North Carolina. Missionaries sent by the Synod. The oldest Presbyterian Congregation in the State in Duplin. The Welsh Tract. Their position on the Map. MAdens parentage, &c. MADEN;S JOURNAL. The earliest Missionary Journal in Carolina that has been preserved. Passes through Berkeley and Frederick Counties in Virginia. Stops at Opecquon. Stays some time in Augusta. Visits John Brown of Providence. Keeps a day of Fasting on Timber Ridge. At Forks of James River receives news of Braddocks Defeat. Crosses the mountain and goes to Mr. Henrys Congregation. Enters North Carolina. Commences his Mission proper. Visits Eno and Tar River. Returns to Eno. Goes to the Hawfield, to the Buffalo Settlement. Goes to the Yadkin. Crosses Yadkin and passes slowly on to Sugar Creek Sets off for South Carolina. Ledges out for the first time. Destitution in the upper part of South Carolina. Retraces his steps to the Yadkin, and then turns down the country towards the Cape Fear. Visits the Scotch settlements. Goes to Wilmington. Goes to the Welsh Tract, and is detained by their entreaties. Visits Goshen. Calls made out for him from Goshen and the Welsh Tract. Sets out for home. Meets Governor Dobbs. Crosses Pamtico. Goes to the Red Banks. Stops at Fishing Creek. Goes to Nutbush. Revisits Hico, Hawfields and the Run. Journal ends abruptly and leaves him at McMessaer on James River. MAdens labors as Pastor in North Carolina. His residence in Duplin. Removes to Caswell. Extract from letter from Dr. MAden. House plundered by the British Army. Place of Burial. Churches in Duplin and New Hanover after his removal. Rev. Messrs. Dr. Robinson, Mr. Stanford, Mr. Hatch, Mr. McIver. Mr. James Tate ; his visits up Blade River; his character. William Bingham. Cohn Lindsey; difficulties removes; suspended; his wife. Rev. Robert Tate. MAdens places of Preaching while residing in Caswell. Formation of Upper, Middle, and Lower Hico. Bethany or Rattlesnake. A Preaching place in Pittsylvania.

CHAPTER XIV. CHURCH OF SUGAR CREEK ITS FIRST MINISTER, ALEXANDER CRAIGHEAD.

The third Minister in Carolina. His ancestry. Rev. Thomas Craighead. First Ecclesiastical notice of Alexander Craighead, in connexion with Mr. John Paul. They adopt the Confession, Mr. Craigheads manner of preaching. Gets into difficulties with his brethren. Defends himself. Case carried up to Synod. He withdraws with the New Brunswick Presbytery. Removes to Virginia. A Member of Hanover Presbytery Flees from Virginia and is settled in Carolina. Here ends his days, 1776. His love of Liberty. His Pamphlet. His situation in Mecklenburg. Sows THE SEEDS OF THE MECKLENBURG DECLARATION. The Settlement of this Upper country. The two tides of Emigration. The line of settlement. Location of Sugar Creek Meeting House. THE PARENT OF THE SEVEN CONGREGATIONS. The Prairies. Extent of the Congregations. The bounds of the SEVEN settled in 1764. A visit to the old grave yard. Craigheads Grave. His Family. Joseph, Alexander. Grave yard at the Brick Church S. C. Caldwell; his Services, Character and Manner. The Alexanders. Their Emigration. Lord Stirling. Mrs. Jackson and her son. Bufords Defeat. Mrs. Flinn. Neighboring Localities .

CHAPTER XV. HOPEWELL AND THE RECORDS OF THE CONVENTION.

Situation of Hopewell. Capt. Bradley. General Davidson. John MKnitt Alexander. Settlement of the Country. Anecdote of Alexander and Dr. Flinn. State of Society. The papers of the Convention. Judge Camerons Statement. Reasons for the temporary obscurity of the Convention. The Convention called in question. Br. Alexander vindicates it. Testimony of different persons; Dr. Hunter, General Graham, and Major David Son, and Dr. Cummins, and Mr. Jack, and Col. Polk, of Raleigh. Obituary of Dr. H. MKnitt Alexander. Rules of Union between the Churches of Hopewell and Sugar Creek in 1793 .

CHAPTER XVI. THE REV. HENRY PATTILLO AND THE CHURCHES IN ORANGE AND GRANVILLE,

Mr. Davies becomes acquainted with Pattillo. Mr. Pattillo goes to reside with him. His reasons for commencing a journal. Extracts from it; his birth; becomes a merchants clerk ; removes to Virginia; commences teaching school ; his religious convictions; oral meditations; an error; his desire to preach the Gospel; his Licensure ; how sustained while preparing for the Ministry ; his house struck with lightning. Extracts from Records of Hanover Presbytery. Goes to Hawfields, N. C., 1765. Removes to Granville, 1774. Member of Provincial Congress, 1775. Extracts from the records of Provincial Congress. The Churches in Granville. First Sacrament. Anecdote of Tennant. Extract from a Will made 1782. Act of the Congregations. Mr. Pattillos marriage; his College Degree; his writings and publications; his death. Extract from Mr. Laceys funeral sermon. Extract from a letter respecting his death. His successors, John Matthews, M. Currie and S. L. Graham. Origin of Congregations of Hawfields and Eno. Visits of Missionaries; MAdens visit in 1755 and 56 ; Mr. Debou, William Hodges, William Paisley. FIRST CAMP MEETINGS IN THE SOUTHERN STATES. Mr. E. B. Currie, Samuel Paisley; other supplies. Death of John Paisley. The Regulators not ignorant people

CHAPTER XVII. DAVID CALDWELL, D.D., AND THE CHURCHES IN ORANGE.

Unusual time of Ministerial services. Birth and parentage of Dr. Caldwell. His admission to the Church. Takes his degree in College at the age of thirty six. Prepares for the ministry. His frankness and perseverance. Extract from minutes of Synod of New York and New Jersey. The Congregation of Buffalo. Caldwell visits Carolina. Alamance organized. Mr. Caldwells commission as Missionary. Is ordained July, 1165; installed, 1768; married, 1166; opens a Classical School; his success in educating youth. Mrs. Caldwells influence. Revivals in his school. He practises Medicine. Is a close student. Orange Presbytery formed. The character of the Regulators. Mr. Caldwells inter course with them. His sufferings in the war. His labors and influence after the Revolution. Section of the Constitution. Harmonizes with Dr. Brevard in his paper of 1775. Public favor seeks him. Appointment of Clerk of a Court. His sermon during the last war with England. Degree of D.D. conferred on him by the University of N. C. His death. Death of Mrs. Caldwell. Their Burial place. Dilly Paine, or the Tradition about Mrs. Paisley

CHAPTER XVIII. NEW PROVIDENCE AND ITS MINISTERS.

Situation of New Providence. Few manuscripts left. Wallis; grave. First Minister of Providence. His nephew. W. R. Davis, Major and Colonel. Rev. Robert Henry, Articles of agreement with Clear Creek. Thomas Reese. The sufferings of the Congregation. James Wallis; birth and education. His contest with Infidelity. The character of the Revolutionary soldiers in Mecklenburg and Upper Carolina. Anecdote of old Mr. Alexander. The discussion about the Bible. An Infidel Debating Society. Cause of dissatisfaction about Psalmody; a division follows. Great Camp Meeting. He teaches a Classical School Is made Trustee of the University. Sharon set off as a Church .

CHAPTER XIX. MAJOR GENERAL JOSEPH GRAHAM.

His place of residence. His employment. His habits of intercourse. His origin. Time and place of his birth. His education. Enters the army, 1718. In various expeditions. Taken with a fever. At work in the field when the news of the enemys approach reached him. Takes the field as Adjutant. The attack on Charlotte. The enemy three times repulsed. The Carolina forces retreat. Locke killed. Graham left for dead. Revives and is conveyed away. Taken to the Hospital. After His recovery raises a company of fifty five men at his own expense, Dec., 1780. Battle of Cowpens, Jan. 1781. Posted at Cowans Ford. Davidson killed. Graham follows the enemy. Surprises Harts Mill. At the surprise of Col. Pyles. The time of enlistment expiring, his men return home. Rutherford raises a force and Graham becomes Major. Marches to Wilmington. His last engagement. Sheriff. Member of Assembly. Marries. Removes to Lincoln county. Appointed General. Marches against the Indians. Basis of his political creed. Extract from Judge Murphys Oration. His religious creed. His moral and religious character and intercourse with men. Death and burial.His Portrait

CHAPTER XX. BATTLE OF KING'S MOUNTAIN.

By whom drawn up. Situation of the country after Gatess defeat, 1780. Cornwallis sends out Col. Ferguson. His march. The increase of his force. Their arms. His threats to the Mountain Men (Tennesseeans and Kentuckians). McDowell, and Sevier, and Shelby, in consultation. Raise forces. The number in camp at place of rendezvous. Ferguson retreats and sends a dispatch to Cornwallis. His march to Kings mountain. The Colonels send for a General Officer. In the meantime Col. Campbell commands. Col. Williams of South Carolina joins them on their march. Approach Fergusons Camp. Plan of Battle. Come in sight of the enemy. Position of the enemys camp. Order of the troops. The battle begins. Ferguson charges and is driven back; second and third charge. Fire all round the mountain. Ferguson charges repeatedly and is driven back; is wounded; is killed. Bearer of the flag shot down; another is raised. They throw down their arms. The killed and wounded. The court martial. Executions. Monument to Major Chronicle and others. Col. William, Colonels MDowell, Hambrite, Sevier and Cleveland. Col. Campbell, of Virginia; his burial place. Anecdote of Col. Ferguson. Anecdote of Campbell.

Anecdote of Preston

CHAPTER XXI THE BATTLE AT GUILFORD COURTHOUSE.

Plan of the battle. Circumstances of the pursuit Its end. Burning of MAdens library. The preludes of the battle. Col. Websters escape. Cornwallis in Buffalo Congregation; in Alamance; at Dr. Caldwells. The sufferings of the family. The burning of his library. The commencement of the battle. The battle ground. The situation of Greenes army. Extract of a letter showing the effects of the first fire. Extract from a soldiers diary. Death of Col. Webster. The militia.

CHAPTER XXII. MINUTES OF THE SYNOD OF THE CAROLINAS FROM 1788 TO 1801, INCLUSIVE, WITH A ROLL OF THE MEMBERS.

Formation of the Synod. The Presbyteries and their members. The first meeting in Centre Rowan. An overture respecting the Catechism. Second meeting. The report respecting the Catechism taken up again. Overture on horse racing, card playing, dancing and revelling. Overture on attending on divine worship. Ordered that the overtures and answers be read in all the churches. Marriage with wifes sisters daughter condemned. Third Meeting. Overtures for printing part of Dr. Doddridges works. Day of Thanksgiving. Fourth Meeting. Preparation made for printing Dr. Doddridges work on Regeneration, and his Rise and Progress. Decision respecting Psalmody. Question respecting Universalists sent up to the Assembly. Question respecting admitting Members, are they to assent to the Confession of Faith &c. Commission of Synod appointed. Steps taken to collect materials for history of the Presbyterian Church. Domestic Missions commenced in earnest. Four Missionaries appointed. Statistical reports from the Presbyteries of Orange and South Carolina. Fifth Meeting. Decision of the General Assembly on the question sent up the last meeting respecting admitting Universalists to communion, in the negative. Printing of Doddridges work. Report from the Commission of Synod on Missionary operations. A peculiar instruction to the missionaries. Their report on judicial business. Synod approved their doings. Sixth Meeting. Erring members to be speedily called upon. Letter from the Rev. Henry Pattillo; his request that it be admitted to record. Propose to send not layman rather than seize upon foreigners. Report concerning Doddridges works. Commission of Synod report concerning the Missionaries, Seventh Meeting. Synod direct the Presbytery of Orange to decide on the case of Mr. Archibald; which they forthwith did, and he was suspended. Directions respecting materials for history of the Church. Commission of Synod report respecting the Missionaries; full report. Mutual reports from Ministers and Sessions to Presbyteries. Eighth Meeting. Direct the Presbytery of Orange to ordain Mr. McGee sine titulo. Presbytery of Orange divided and Concord constituted. Report to Synod respecting the printing of Doddridges works. Day of fasting appointed. Ninth Meeting. Failure of printing Doddridges work. Hopewell Presbytery set off. Question respecting the evidence of baptized slaves. Injunction to give slaves religious instructions. Attention of Synod taken up by the difficulties in Abingdon Presbytery; a new Presbytery constituted there. Mr. Gillelands memorial about his course respecting slavery. Synod agree with his Presbytery. Tenth Meeting. A Commission of Synod appointed; suspend the Independent Presbytery. Minutes of the Commission of Synod. Its members; 14 ministers and 12 elders. The Commission restore the suspended members. Charges against Hezekiah Balch. 1st charge ; of this he was cleared. 2d charge; false doctrines. This referred to the General Assembly; a curious statement, 3d charge; in part sustained. 4th charge; on this he was condemned by the Commission as irregular. Abingdon Presbytery divided, and Union Presbytery set off. Overture on promiscuous communion. Eleventh Meeting. Suspension removed from Mr. Crawford. Charges against Mr. Balch read. Mr. Balch brings charges against the old session. Extraordinary Session, 1799. Thirty folio pages of evidence produced and road. 3d and 4th charges against Mr. Balch not sustained. On the 5th charge the Synod decided against Mr. Balch. The two other charges not sustained. Synod suspend Mr. Balch and four elders. The matter settled. Twelfth Meeting, 1799. Overture on the subject of marriage in the forbidden degree. Mr. Bowmans case taken up. Reports from four of the Presbyteries. South Carolina Presbytery divided. Thirteenth Meeting. Two independent Ministers invited to a seat. Overture respecting a petition to the Legislature on Abolition dismissed. The Missionary business. Two Missionaries sent to the Natches. Will a private acknowledgment of wrong be taken for a public confession? Negative. Mr. Balch complains of the Presbytery of Abingdon. Greenville Presbytery set off. Complaint about Mr. Witherspoon. Fourteenth Meeting. Reports from the Missionaries to the Natches. Case of incestuous marriage. Mr. Balch's complaints taken up. Mr. Witherspoons case decided. Synods solemn recommendations. Synod ordered the subject of Missions to be laid before the Congregations, and collections to be taken up. Case of Green Spring and Sinking Spring Missionaries to Mississippi Territory

CHAPTER XXIII. EMIGRATION TO TENNESSEE.

Tennessee settled early from Carolina. Meaning of Mountain Men, &c. Emigration from other States. The first Minister in Tennessee. The Rev. Samuel Doak. Martin Academy. Washington College. His early life and his usefulness. Rev. Samuel Houston. Rev. Messrs. Hezekiah Balch and Samuel Carrick. Mr. Craighead. Abingdon Presbytery. Trustees of Washington College, of Blount College, and of Greenville College.

CHAPTER XXIV. JAMES HALL, D.D., AND THE CHURCHES IN IREDELL.

Clergymen in the army; some gave up their ministry. James Hall served as a soldier and continued a preacher. Birth place. Place of Emigration. Names of families emigrating. Minute of Synod of Philadelphia in 1753. Minute in 1754. Minute in 1757. Minute of Synod of New York in 1755. Minute from the Synod of New York and Philadelphia. Efforts for Ministers. Salary promised; eighty pounds for half the time. Halls early instruction. The coming of a Missionary. Minute for 1764 by Synod. Mr. Hall unites with the church. His early habits and desires as a Christian. Devotes himself to the Ministry. A perplexing incident the cause of his remaining single through life. His age when he commences the Classics. His taste for Mathematics. Is graduated at Princeton. Dr. Witherspoons opinion of him. Licensed to preach the Gospel. Ministers in Carolina at that time. Mr. Hall installed Pastor. His Elders. Espouses cause of the Revolution. Raises a company of cavalry to go to South Carolina. An incident reconnoitreing. Raises a second company. A third company raised and Mr. Hall goes with them. A novel scene in preaching. His qualifications as A commander. General Greene proposes him for General to fill the place of Davidson. A revival of Religion in his charge. His first attendance on the Synod. Commences his Missionary excursions. A pioneer to the Natches. His reports of his Missions. His attendance on the General Assembly. His journeys to the Assembly. An incident. Trains men for the Ministry. Clios Nursery. Opens an Academy of Science at his own house. Prepares a Grammar for his young people. A circulating library. List of preachers educated by him. Favors the establishment of a Theological Seminary. Member of the Bible Society. Anecdote. His boldness and independence, an anecdote of. His manner of preaching. His occasional melancholy, anecdote of it. His tenderness for the suffering of others under it. Made Doctor of Divinity by Nassau Hall and University of N. C. His death and burial

CHAPTER XXV. REV. LEWIS FEUILLETEAU WILSON.

The successor of Dr. Hall in his charge of Concord and Fourth Creek Origin and birth. Is sent to England. Emigrates to New Jersey and enters College. Revival in Princeton College in 1712. His religious experience. Great opposition. Anecdote. Becomes convicted, hopefully converted. His succeeding course. His view of College Honors. Visits England. Wishes to enter the Ministry. His Fathers wishes. His Father offended and disinherits him. He returns to America. Commences Theological reading with Dr. Witherspoon. His perplexity of mind. Commences the study of Medicine. Enters the Army. His fathers death. A Legacy. Settles in Princeton. His deportment in the Army. Mr. Hall persuades him to remove to IREDELL, N. C. His marriage. Desires to enter the Ministry. The people also desire it. Licensed by Orange Presbytery in 1791. Becomes Pastor of Concord and Fourth Creek. The Revival of 1802. His views of it. Leaves Fourth Creek. His successors there. His death. His character by John M. Wilson of Rocky River. His manner of preaching. His dying exercises

CHAPTER XXVI. THYATIRA AND HER MINISTERS.

Settlement of THYATIRA. McAdens course through the settlement, 1755. Visit of Messrs. Spencer and McWhorter. Samuel E. McCorkle. Birthplace. His parents emigrate to North Carolina. Their locations. The Father an Elder and the Son Pastor of the Church. Commences a Classical course. Takes his degree at Nassau Hall, 1772. Extracts from his diary. His early experience. His exercises during the Revival of 1772. Extract from Boston. Reads Hopkins. Is deeply distressed. Reads Smalley. Mr. Greens Sermon. He commences reading for the Ministry. Licensed and called to THYATIRA. His Marriage. Anecdote of Mrs. Steele and General Green. Obituary of Mrs. Steele. Her letter to her Children after her death. A prayer from her pen. Mr. McCorkles residence. Opens a Classical School. A Teachers department. The first Graduates of the University of N. C. Is appointed a Professor in the University. Declines the appointment. Bounds of Thyatira. Third Creek formed from it. Rev. J. D. Kilpatrick. His views of the Revival in 1802. Anecdote of him. Back Creek formed. Salisbury Church formed. Mr. McCorkles Bible Classes. His Pulpit preparations. His printed Sermons. His appearance. Resemblance to Mr. Jefferson. His Pulpit instructions. Delegates to the Assembly. His views of the Revival of 1802. Struck with Death in the Pulpit, His Funeral. Thomas Espy. His birth. His early exercises on Religion. Commences a Classical course. Unites with the Church, 1820. Enters College. Goes to Virginia. Commences preparations for the Ministry. Licensure. Influence of his example. A Missionary to Burke, N. C. Is ordained Evangelist. Leaves Centre and goes to Salisbury. Seized with a hemorrhage. His last sickness. A testimony concerning him. His death.

CHAPTER XXVII. REV. JAMES M'GREADY AND THE REVIVALS OF 1800.

His agency in Revivals. No memoir of him has hitherto appeared. His origin. Emigration to North Carolina. Reasons of his education. His early Religious views. A change in them. Its influence on his after life and Preaching. Licensed by Red Stone Presbytery. Returns to Carolina. Religion suffered during the War. McGready attends a funeral His appearance. His first Sermons. His pulpit preparations. His print. ed sermons. His manner of delivery. Places of preaching. His residence. Visits Dr. Caldwells School with happy effect Excitement on Religion. Opposition on Stony Creek. McGready and others remove to the West. Extract from McGreadys statement of the condition of things in Kentucky. Commencement of the Revival in 1800. The exercises of a bodily nature. Crowds attend meetings for days in succession. The Revival commences in North Carolina, 1801, at Cross Roads. Also at Hawfields. The first Camp Meeting in North Carolina. The Revival spreads over the State. Dr. Caldwell appoints a meeting in Randolph County. An interesting pamphlet printed in Philadelphia, containing an account of the Revival. A Clergymans account of the exercises experienced by himself. His opinion of them

CHAPTER XXVIII. REV. HUMPHREY HUNTER AND STEELE CHEER, GOSHEN AND UNITY.

Mr. Hooter first a Soldier and then a Minister. Settlement of Steele Creek. Names of its Ministers. Location of the Church. The Grave Yard. A visit to it The inscriptions of a Soldier. Anecdote. Other inscriptions of a different age. Monuments to little children. Poetic inscriptions. The use of Psalms and Hymns. Grave of two Brothers. Monument of Rev. Mr. Hunter. Extract from Gordons History. Mr. Hunters birthplace. Emigrates to America when a child. Grows op in Mecklenburg. Attends the Convention. Enlists as a Soldier. Commences his Classical course. Certificate. A Lieutenant against the Indians. Goes to Queens Museum. Certificate. College broken up. Enters the Army. Is at the battle of Camden. Witnesses the death of De Kalb. The circumstances of it Prisoners in confinement. Anecdote of Hunter. Escapes from confinement. Joins the Army again. Resumes his studies, Two Certificates. Enters Mount Zion College. His degree. His licensure. A call with the Signatures. Removes to Lincoln. Settlement of Goshen. Its Location, Preaches at Steele Creek. Practises Medicine. His performances as a Minister. His Death. Notice of it. His appearance and character

CHAPTER XXIX. CENTRE CONGREGATION,

Fall of General Davidson on the Catawba. His birth and burial. Boundaries of Centre. The first white child born between the two rivers. Origin of the inhabitants. Rev. Thomas H. McCaule. Classical school. Dr. McRee the Minister for about thirty years. His birth and Parentage. His Fathers library. Custom to Catechise. His College course and preparation for the Ministry. Settlement at Steele Creek. Extract from a Letter. Essay on Psalmody. Settles in Centre. Extract from a Letter.

CHAPTER XXX. POPLAR TENT AND HER MINISTERS.

Ministers to be disengaged from Politics. Hezekiah James Balch in the Convention. Minutes of Synod respecting him. His congregations. His Death. Location of Poplar Tent. Settlement and building of the Meeting House. Mr. Alexanders account. Dr. Robinsons. Meaning of word Tent. Their use. The name of Poplar Tent. No Monument to Mr. Balch. Names of the Elders. Robert Archibald. Psalmody. Anecdote Of. Discussion about. Poplar Tent not harassed in the War. Mr. Archibalds habits. Becomes erroneous in his Creed. Anecdote of him. Mr. Alexander Caldwell. John Robinson. His birth place and parentage. Excellent Memory. His agency in the present work. His Education. His College Degree. His Licensure. His personal appearance. Commences Preaching in a trying time. His first place of Labor. Removes to Fayetteville. Removes to Poplar Tent. Returns to Fayetteville. First Communion in Fayetteville. His manner of preaching there. The opinion of His worth thirty two years after. His kind feelings. His advanced years. Anecdote. Friend of Education. Anecdote of his Courage. One of His Faithfulness. Meeting of Synod during his last sickness. His death and burial

CHAPTER XXXI. EXTRACTS FROM MINUTES OF THE SYNOD OF THE CAROLINAS FROM 1902 TO 1812 INCLUSIVE.

Fifteenth Meeting. Missionary report from Matthews and Hall. A commission of Synod appointed. Grammar Schools to be erected; and. Youth licensed for the Ministry. Overture about exhorters. Petitions from Abingdon. Stated Clerk appointed. Sixteenth Meeting. Missionary to Catawbas appointed. Overture respecting Candidates. Seventeenth Meeting. Greenville Presbytery dissolved. Missionaries sent to Natches. Overture respecting other denominations. Other overtures Eighteenth Meeting. Report of the Mission among the Catawbas. Non-attending Presbyteries written to. Respecting the Presbytery of Charleston. Nineteenth Meeting. The Records transcribed by the new clerk, Mr. Davies. Overture the Assembly for Division. Overture respecting Ministers holding Civil offices. Twentieth Meeting. A memorial respecting William C. Davis. Application of the Presbytery of Union to change their connexion. Missionary operations. Questions concerning Elders in Synod. Twenty first Meeting. The Missionary operations. The Minutes of Synod on the Reports. The case of Mr. Davis taken up. Overture respecting Qualifications of Parents asking baptism for Children. Report on the subject of Communing with the Methodists. Twenty second Meeting. Missionary matters. A long and interesting Report from Mr. Hall. He prepares questions for the people. His visit to Knobb Creek. Case of Mr. Davis comes up. The charges against him. His explanations. The decision of Presbytery. Synod, dissatisfied with it, takes up the case. Mr. Davis appeals to the Assembly. Synod remits the case with an overture on the book published by Mr. Davis called the Gospel Plan. Harmony Presbytery setoff. Pastoral letter ordered on account Mr. Daviss errors. Twenty third Meeting. First Presbytery of South Carolina dissolved. Overture concerning Lotteries. Extract from Mr. Halls report on Missions. Ordination of Mr. Caldwell of the University sanctioned. Twenty fourth Meeting. Presbytery of Orange ask advice respecting Mr. Davis. Dr. Hall reports on his Missionary tour. The Synod resign their Missionary operations to the hands of the Assembly. Action on the subject of ordination sine titulo. Order to circulate copies of the Confession of Faith. Twenty fifth Meeting. Report of Dr. Hall of Missionary labor, Support of the Missionary and contingent funds of the Assembly enjoined. Presbytery of Fayetteville set off. Action of Synod concerning Ordinations sine titulo

CHAPTER XXXII. REV. JOHN MAKEMIE WILSON, D. ., AND THE CHURCH OF ROCKY RIVER.

His parentage. Incident in his early life. Enters the school in Charlotte. Completes his course of study at Hampden Sydney College. Devotes himself to the Ministry. Settled in Burke County. Marries. Removes to Rocky river. The Settlement of Rocky River. Origin of the Settlers. Some of the names. They favor the Regulator. Destruction of powder by the Black boys. Mr. Archibald the Minister. A Revival of Religion. Mr. Alexander Caldwell. Becomes deranged and leaves them. Mr. Wilson becomes their Pastor. The estimation in which he was held by the people. His Ministerial habits, opens a Classical school and educates a large number of Ministers of the Gospel. His preparation for death. His burial. His son a Missionary to Africa. Dies there. Mr. Wilsons grave and epitaph.

CHAPTER XXXIII. FAYETTEVILLE AND HER MINISTERS.

Cross Creek. The name. Campbelton. The public road opened. Name changed to Fayetteville. First stated Preacher. Second Preacher. Ordination of Elders. First administration of the Lords Supper. The Third Preacher ordained. Baptism administered publicly. Mr. Robinson returns. Mr. Turner. His labors and death. His successor. Church building put up. Succession of Ministers. Second Pastor removed by death. Mr. Douglass. A short Memoir of him. His spirit. His Parentage. His Religious impressions. His temptation in New York. Preparation for the Ministry. Foreign Mission. Visits Mr. Nettleton. Habits of piety. His labors as a Missionary. Ordained. Gathers a Church in Murfreesborough. Goes to Milton. Gathers a Church there. Goes to Briery Goes to Richmond. Goes to Ireland. Extract from a letter. Visits the great valley of the Mississippi. Goes to Lexington, Virginia. Goes to Fayetteville. His pastoral habits. Fayetteville Presbytery. Its formation. Notice of. Mr. McMillan. Mr. McNair. Mr. Peacock. Mr. McIntyre. Mr. McDougald

CHAPTER XXXIV. CHARLOTTE AND HER RECOLLECTIONS,

Extract from Tarletons History of the Southern Campaigns. Charlotte uncomfortable head quarters to Cornwallis. Extract from Tarleton upon the difficulty of obtaining provisions. The affair at McIntyres. Epitaph of one of the men engaged in this affair. Extract from Steadmans History of the American war. The place of encampment of the British army. Evacuation of Charlotte, the Polk family. Thomas Spratt

CHAPTER XXXV. EFFORTS TO PROMOTE EDUCATION.

Sentiments of the females in Carolina about education. The oldest Academy. Attempts to make a College. A charter obtained and revoked by the King. A second time obtained and revoked. Queens Museum goes into operation, chartered as Liberty Hall Academy by the Colonial Legislature. Extract from Charter. Trustees. First President. Laws drawn op by a committee. Overture to Dr. McWhorter. Certificate. Second President. Third President. The Academy broken up. Mount Zion College. List of Academies by Presbyterians. Probable proportion of those able to road. The institutions established by Presbyterians. The Caldwell Institute its origin and principles of operation. Opinion of Dr. Caldwell. The Donaldson Academy. Davidson College ; its principles. Attention to female education. Martin Academy in Tennessee. Extract from the report of the Committee of Fayetteville Presbytery .

CHAPTER XXXVI. THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AND REV. JOSEPH CALDWELL, D.D.

A visit to the University on Commencement day. Death of a young lady. The University a State Institution. The interest of the Presbyterians in it. The Legislature determine to found a University. The Trustees. Its location. Laying the corner stone. Extract from the speech of Dr. MCorkle. The University is opened. The first Professor. Mr. Harris recommends Mr. Caldwell. His parentage. His early training. Commences his Classical course. His education abandoned. At the suggestion of Dr. Witherspoon his course is renewed. Enters College. His views respecting his conduct in College. Takes his degree. Commences school teaching. Is made tutor in Nassau Hall. His connection with the church under Mr. Austin. Correspondence with his classmate. Appointed professor of Mathematics at Chapel Hill. Sets out for Carolina. Anecdote of Dr. Green. Enters on his office. The advantages of his situation. The difficulties of it. The efforts of infidel notions. Extract from a letter. Exhibition of Presbyterian principles. False notions of education. Ordination of Dr. Caldwell. His talents judged by his works. Advocates he Presbyterial High School. His religious experience

Index

Abraham, Adair, Adam, Adams, Adamson, Addison, Agnew, Aiken, Aird, Aleson, ALEXANDER, Alexanders, Alison, Allen, Allison, Allisons, Anderson, Andrew, Andrews, Antrim, Archibald, Ashe, Ashmore, Atkinson, Atterson, Austin, Avery, Baird, Balch, Baldwin, BANE, Barclays, Barnet, Barr, Barrow, Barry, Bassett, Baxter, Bay, Bayleys, Beach, Beard, Beattie, Beck, Bell, Benedict, Benny, Bethel, Bigem, Bigham, Bingham, Black, Blackburn, Blair, BLAIR, Blois, Bloodworth, Blount, Blythe, Boggs, Bone, Boote, Booth, Bostwick, Boswell, Bounds, Bourk, Bovelle, Bowen, Bowman, Boyd, Boyds, Boyer, Braddock, Bradley, Brainerd, Brandon, Brevard, Brice, Brown, Bryan, Buford, Buie, Bullock, Burch, Burke, Burton, Burwell, Butler, Cabarrus, Calderwoods, Caldwell, Calhoun, Calton, Calver, Cameron, Campbell, Canady, Cann, Carragan, Carrick, Carrigan, Carrington, Carroll, Carruth, Carson, Carter, Caruthers, Caswell, Cathey, Chaplain, Chapman, Chatham, Chesnut, Chester, Chichester, Childs, Chronicle, Clack, Clark, Clarks, Cleaveland, Cleveland, Clinton, Cockran, Coffee, Coffin, Cole, Collins, Colton, Conway, Cooke, Cooper, Corbin, Cornwallis, Cossan, Cottom, Couser, Cowan, Cowen, Craig, Craighead, Craven, Crawford, Criswell, Crocket, Cromwell, Crookshanks, Cross, Cruser, Cummings, Cummins, Cunningham, Currie, Curry, Dale, Dalzel, Dandridge, Davenport, Davidson, Davie, Davies, Davis, De Kalb, Deaderick, Dean, Debow, DeKalb, Delvaux, Denney, Denny, Dickens, Dickey, Dickson, Divinny, Dixon, Doak, Doake, Dobbin, Dobbs, Dock, Doddridge, Donaldson, , Donnell, Douglass, Dowell, Downe, Downey, Draffen, Drummond, Duffield, Dunbar, Duncan, Dunlap, Dunn, Dupeister, Edmonds, Edmondson, EDMUNDS, Edwards, Ellises, Elmore, Emerson, Ervin, Erwin, Espy, Evans, Fanning, Feemster, Ferguson, Few, Finley, Fisher, Fisk, Flagler, Flenniken, Flinn, Forbes, Ford, Foster, Francis, Francisco, Franklin, Frazer, Frazier, Freeman, Futhey, Gage, Gagney, Galbraith, Garden, Gasque, Gates, Gaven, George, Gibson, Gilchrist, , Gilleland, Gillespie, Gilliam, Gilmer, GILMOR, Givens, GLENDENNING, Goff, Goodrich, Gordon, xix, Gorrel, Gould, Graham, Granger, Grant, Graves, Gray, Green, Greene, Greer, Gregg, Gretter, Grier, Grove, Gullick, Gunby, Gurley, Hagens, HALL Halsey, Hambrite, Hamilton, Hamiltons, Hampton, Hancock, Hanger, Harden, Harding, Harget, Harker, Harnett, Harrington, Harris, Hart, Hatch, Hawkins, Hay, Haywood, Hedge, Hedley, Henderson, Henekin, Henry, Herring, Herron, Hewes, Hill, Hinton, Hobart, Hodge, Hodges, , Hoge, Hogg, Hogge, Holcomb, Holden, Holland, Holmes, Holton, Hooper, Hopkins, Hott, Houston, Howard, Howell, Howie, Hubbard, Hudson, Hughes, Humphrey, Hunt, Hunter Husbands, Innes, Iredell, Ireland, Irwin, Jack, Jackson, James, Jefferson, Jelly, Johnson, Johnston, Jones, Keiths, Kelly, Kelso, Kennedy, Kennon, Kerr, Kerrs, Kilpatrick, King, Kirk, Kirkham, Kirkpatrick, Knealy, Knox, Kolluck, Lacey, Lacy, Lafayette, Lake, Lancaster, Lane, Langdon, Langfords, Lapsley, Latham, Latta, Lattar, Laurie, Lawrence, Lawson, Lee, Leech, Lees, Leftwich, Legrand, Leland, Lenoir, Leslie, Leslies, Lewis, Ligget, Lillington, Lincoln, Lindley, Lindsay, Lindsey, Linn, Linsey, Livingston, Locke, Love, Lovel, Luckey, Luckie, Lyle, Lynch, Lytle, Macdonnells, Mace, Mackenzie, Maclane, Macon, Macwhorter, MAden, Makemie, Makenzie, Makenzies, Mallett, Maroney, Marshall, Martin, Mather, Mathews, Matthews, Maxwells, Mayben, McAden, McAdo, McAllister, McAlpin, McAuslin, McCadden, McCafferty, McCaul, McCaule, McClellan, McClelland, McClung, McClure, McCorkle, McCoulsky, McCoy, McCuistin, McCulloch, McCullock, McD, McDermaid, McDiarmid, McDonald, McDonalds, McDougal, McDougald, McDowell, McEnzie, McEwin, McFarland, McGee, McGlaughlin, McGready, McIlheney, McIntire, McIntyre, McIver, McIvor, McKay, MCKEE, McKennan, McKillan, McKnight, McLean, McLelland, McLeod, McLeods, McLeran, McMillan, McMordie, McNair, McNeely, McNeill, McNutt, MCorkle, McPheeters, McRAE, McRee, McRoberts, MCulloch, McWain, McWhorter, MDiarmid, MDonald, MDougald, Means, Mebane, Mecklin, Meek, MElhenney, MElhenny, Meroney, Merony, Merrill, Messaux, Messer, MGready, Michel, Micklejohn, Millan, Miller, Milligan, Mills, Milton, Mntyre, Mitchell, MIver, MNair, MNish, Moffat, Moffitt, Mons, Montgomery, Moorcraft, Moore, Moores, Morehead, Morgan, Morrison, Morrow, Mosely, MPheeters MRee, Muldrow, Murdock, Murphy, MWhorter, Nash, Nation, Neal, Neale, Neel, Neeley, Neely, Neil, Neill, Nelson, Newton, Norton, OHarra, Oliphant, Orr, Osborn, Osborne, Paine, Paisley, Paley, Parks, Pattello, Patterson, Pattillo Patton, Paul, Payne, Peacock, Pearson, Peebles, Perkins, Person, Pettigrew, Pfifer, Pharr, Philips, Pickens, Poage, Polk, Porter, Posey, Potts, Powell, Prather, Preston, Prevost, Pringle, Pugh, Purviance, Queary, Query, Quinn, Ramsay, Ramsey, Randle, Rankin, Rawdon, Ray, Rea, Reah, Reece, Reed, Reedy, Rees, Reese, Reeves, Reid, Rhea, Rice, Richardson, RIDGE, Rise, Roan, Roane, Robinson, Rockwell, iv, Roland, Rosborough, Ross, Rosses, Roy, Ruolstone, Rush, Russell, Rutherford, Rutledge, Salter, Sample, Sampson, Sankey, Schaw, Schomberg, Scott, Scroggs, Sellars, Semes, Semple, Settlington, Sevier, Shackleford, Shaffer, Shankland, SHARPE, Shaw, Shaws, Shelby, Sherman, Shnipe, Sibley, Sibpeanes, Silliman, Simms, Simpson, Singleton, Sloan, Smith, Smylie, Snead, Sneed, Snoddy, Snodgrass, Sommervil, Sparrow, Speight, Spencer, Spratt, Springer, Stafford, Stanford, Steadman, Steel, Steele, Stephenson, Stevens, Stevenson, Stewart, Stewarts, Stirling, Stitt, Stokes, Stone, Story, Stuart, Sumner, Sumpter, Swain, iv, Symmes, Tagart, Tarleton, Tarlton, Tate, Taylor, Teate, Telford, Temple, Templeton, Tenable, Tennant, Tennent, Thane, Thatcher, Thompson, Thomson, Tillinghast, Tinnier, Tipton, Todd, Toole, Trail, Trimble, Tryon, Turner, Tyke, Vance, Vanhook, Vannoy, Waddel, Waddell, Walker, Wallace, Wallis, Warson, Watkins, Watson, Watts, Webster, Weddington, Weir, Welch, Wesley, Wheelock, White, Whitefield, Whitsell, Wickham, Wileys, Williams, Williamson, Wilson, Wilsons, WINN, Winslow, Winston, Wirt, Witherspoon, Wolsey, Woodsides, Wool, Wright, Yongue, Yorke, Young,